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Wildfire Safety Drill, 2007

April 13-15, 2007
Salida, Colorado


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Firefighter Type 2 Tasks

NATIONAL INTERAGENCY
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

TASK BOOK FOR THE POSITION OF
FIREFIGHTER TYPE 2 (FFT2)

TASK

CODE*

GENERAL

  1. Check condition of assigned tools, equipment, and gear; maintain or replace as appropriate (cutting tools, scraping tools, smothering tools, backpack pump, head lamp).
  • Inspect the condition of hand tools and equipment for serviceability. Check the condition of each tool and identify those which need replacement or repair.
  • Safely sharpen and field maintain commonly used hand tools or replace as appropriate. Sharpen to standards specified for selected tool, in field or shop, in a safe manner.

 

O

  1. Select proper hand tool for assigned job. Appropriate tools will be selected for cutting, grubbing, scraping, raking, smothering or other field conditions.
O
  1. Use safe and effective procedures when utilizing all assigned tools and equipment (cutting tools, scraping tools, smothering tools, backpack pump, head lamp).
  • Carry hand tools properly.
  • Load hand tools safely in vehicles.
  • Use hand tools properly. Correct techniques will be used for each tool assigned or selected according to fireline condition or requirement.
  • Assemble, fill, and operate backpack pump. Use safe and efficient techniques during operation. Store properly.
  • Assemble, mount, and use head lamp. Identify maintenance procedures.
O
  1. Properly use fire shelter. Describe the correct procedure to select and prepare a site for deployment, and demonstrate the proper deployment and use of the fire shelter.
O
  1. Recognize organization, initial attack and large fire, and follow the chain-of-command.
  • Discuss in correct terminology the ICS organization.
  • Follow chain-of-command. Identify two supervisory positions above level of FFT1 that would be contacted if the Single Resource Boss Crew (CRWB) is not available.
  1. Maintain good personal hygiene and fitness.
  • Satisfactorily complete pack test or physical fitness test as required by agency.

 

O

  1. Bring adequate personal gear and effects according to agency policy.
  • Have available personal protective equipment (PPE). Demonstrate the care and use of PPE utilizing or obtaining items as required by agency policy.
  • Bring other adequate personal gear and effects according to agency policy. Report with complete personal gear and effects for extended assignment. Kit generally includes:
  • Individual first-aid kit.
  • Canteens.
  • Gloves.
  • Hard hat.
  • Goggles.
  • Ear plugs.
  • Fire resistant shirt and trousers.
  • Socks and underwear.
  • Jacket.
  • Boots (8 inch high, leather, lace-up).
  • Toiletry items.
  • Pocket notebook.
  • Compass.
  • Fire shelter.
  • Headlamp.
  • Other items depending on climate and location and type of incident or assignment (e.g., sunscreen, long johns, structural protection gear).
O

INCIDENT ACTIVITIES

  1. Participate in organized and coordinated crew tactical actions.
  • Identify parts of a fire, including head, perimeter, flank, rear, anchor point, finger, and spot.
  • Identify safety islands and planned escape routes. Describe blackline concept.
  • Demonstrate at least two coordinated crew techniques such as one-lick, leapfrog, and bump-up.
  • Describe procedures for direct attack, indirect attack, and parallel attack and when each procedure would be used.
  • Describe seven variations of natural and constructed fire control line.
  • Demonstrate a thorough familiarity of commonly used terms to describe what the fire is doing and how it affects fire control tactics in ground fuels, surface fuels, and aerial fuels.
  • Recognize threats to control lines and counter by appropriate line practices.
  • Describe and/or identify hazards to firefighters.
  • Describe dozer or tractor plow follow-up procedures. Clean up or break up machine piles and berms, fireproof needed areas, limb trees, prepare and burn out control line, mopup the interior, patrol the control line.
  • Discuss safety procedures which should be followed around engines, dozers, and tractor plows.
  • Follow safety procedures when in an area where retardant/water drops are being made. Demonstrate use of hand signals, position, and placement of tools under a simulated control line condition.

 

O

  1. Reduce threat of spotting or slopover by rearranging, removing or fire-proofing fuels near the fireline.
  • Rearrange fuels. Use accepted techniques such as limb-up to reduce ladder fuels and bone yarding.
  • Remove heat source inside and adjacent to control line.
  • Treat fuels outside the fireline.
  • Control a partly dead fire edge.
  • Detect and suppress all spotting and slopovers.
  • Use dry and wet mopup techniques.
  • Construct cup trenches when applicable.
  • Construct water barriers on fireline.
O
  1. Participate in reducing the threat of fire
    exposure to improved properties.
  • Describe procedures to re-arrange/reduce fuels.
  • Describe or identify procedures to secure hazards.
  • Describe procedures to prepare building/structure.
  • Describe the application of pre-treatment agents (water, foam, gel, blanket).
O
  1. Follow established procedures in securing the
    fireline.
  • Continually inspect condition of tools, equipment, and gear. Maintain or replace as appropriate.
  • Follow established safety procedures when working around fireline equipment.
  • Identify hazards and safety procedures when working around fireline machinery.
  • Identify hazards to other firefighters and supervisor.
O
  1. Check condition of firing devices and prepare
    for use.
  • Check condition of firing devices appropriate for “blackline” burnout.
  • Prepare a drip torch for use. Mix fuel, inspect, assemble, and fill torch.
  • Ignite, use, and extinguish drip torch or fusee. Observe established safety procedures.
  • Use expedient firing methods. Demonstrate use of a tool to drag burning materials along ground. Use of matches,
    rags on a stick or other available devices.
O
  1. Follow specified firing sequence and
    coordinate efforts with other personnel.
  • Follow specified firing sequence. Firing will be completed in timely manner following agency safety procedures and directions of CRWB or Single Resource Boss Firing (FIRB).
  • Coordinate with other personnel. Follow instructions of supervisor or FIRB.
  • Report conditions and activities which seem unsafe or counter productive. Apply Standard Fire Orders and Watch Out Situations.
O
  1. Use a systematic procedure for locating and
    suppressing fire within the assigned areas.
  • Locate and suppress fire within assigned area. Use a systematic procedure and appropriate mopup actions.
  • Mopup systematically. Progress from hottest area to coldest. Plan a beginning and ending point. Work inward from control line.
O
  1. Detect or locate hot materials or burning fuels.
  • Use all senses to find hot materials to be mopped up. Use sight, touch, smell, hearing, and mechanical devices to aid detection.
O
  1. Detect and suppress covered fuels.
  • Detect and suppress covered fuels in machine piles.
  • Detect and suppress banked fuels.
  • Identify several possible hazards.
O
  1. Maintain some form of communication with
    designated personnel.
  • Get clear instructions from supervisor on what, how, and when to report. Repeat instructions to verify clear understanding of orders and expectations.
  • Maintain good communications with the crew and supervisor. Use radio, hand signals, written messages, voice (yelling), and use of runners.
O
  1. Identify situations which warrant immediate action and/or reporting.
O
  1. Conduct self in a professional manner.
  • Respectful and courteous as an organized crew member. Fair, responsible, punctual, physically fit, and responsive to work assignments. Perform work safely.
  • Respect those persons having different cultural variance, minorities, and women. Respectful of others.
  • Respect private property.
O
  1. Assume responsibility for fire tools, equipment, and gear.
O
  1. Look out for the safety and welfare of self and
    other crew members and immediately report
    any threat to their safety.
  • Demonstrate ability to apply first aid to stop bleeding and care for cuts, blisters, and heat injuries.
  • Identify situations which warrant immediate action and/or reporting, based on the Standard Fire Orders and Watch Out Situations, and Urban Interface Watch Out Situations.
  • Follow safety procedures for site hazards (e.g., LPG tanks, electrical, septic tanks, etc.).
O
  1. Follow safety procedures for transporting
    personnel and equipment.
  • Follow safety procedures for loading, riding, and unloading personnel and equipment in:
    • Vehicles.
    • Boats.
    • Helicopters.
    • Large transport aircraft.
    • Small fixed-wing aircraft.
  • Identify agency policy and practice safety procedures appropriate to conditions.
  • Follow safety procedures for foot travel and supervisor’s instructions.
O
  1. Follow local policies to maintain environmental quality.
  • Comply with local policy to avoid damage to social or cultural environment.
  • Notify supervisor of historical resources found.
O
  1. Adapt to changing work environment.
  • Accept changes in work assignments and conditions due to stages of the fire. Follow supervisor’s instructions and standards for line construction and mopup.
O
  1. Inspect hose and accessories for type, size, and
    condition.
  • Inspect hose for holes, mildew, rot, damaged threads, inoperative valves. Correctly recognize and describe each item.
  • Recognize and describe the use of tools: spanner wrench, hose clamp, hose mender, couplings.
O
  1. Carry hose and accessories identified by supervisor to assigned locations.

O

  1. Use proper procedure, depending on fuel type and terrain, for deploying hose along a preselected route or around improved properties.
O
  1. Retrieve hose and accessories during emergency and non-emergency situations to designated location.
O
  1. Identify and mark items which are not serviceable.
O
  1. Extend charged hose lay by properly clamping, disconnecting, inserting, and recoupling hose.
O
  1. Under supervision select proper nozzle setting and appropriate agent for the job.
  • Describe fire situation when each of the following will be used: water, foam, gel. Select proper agent and nozzle setting for the job: fog/spray, straight stream, on/off. Describe each method.
O
  1. Identify environmental factors of fire behavior which affect the start and spread of wildland fire.
  • Describe the fire triangle.
  • Define methods of heat transfer.
  • Identify principle environmental factors affecting fire behavior.
  • Explain how fuel size affects fire behavior.
  • Explain how the arrangement of fuels affects fire behavior.
  • Describe how wind affects fire spread.
  • Give weather factors which affect fuel moisture.
  • Describe how topography affects fire spread.
  • Describe how building construction and arrangement affect fire spread.
O
  1. Describe how fire suppression may be used to break the fire triangle.
  • Describe ways of breaking the fire triangle.
  • Give ways in which constructed fireline can be threatened by fire remaining inside of fireline.
  • Define the blackline concept and how it is used.
  • Describe benefits of defensible space around improved properties.
O
  1. List fire weather factors involved in fire suppression.
  • List elements of weather that concerned firefighters use to predict fire behavior.
  • List daily weather processes that can occur in mountainous terrain that will affect wildland fires.
  • Name sources of unusually strong winds which can occur on wildland fires.
  • Give weather situations which can cause rapid shifts in wind direction.
  • Give visual indicators that suggest the weather is changing.
  • List visible parts of cloud development to indicate it is a thunderhead.
  • Describe the safest area around a fire threatened by an approaching thunderhead.
O

*Code:

  • O = task can be completed in any situation (classroom, simulation, prescribed fire, daily job, etc.)
  • I = task must be performed on an incident (flood, fire, prescribed fire, search & rescue, planned event, etc.)
  • W = task must be performed on a wildland fire incident
  • /R = Rare event the evaluation assignment may not provide opportunities to demonstrate performance. The evaluator may be able to determine skills/knowledge through interview or the home office may need to arrange for another assignment or a simulation.
  • RX = task must be performed on a prescribed fire incident

 


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